Introduction

The Nadam Fair is a traditional activity of the Mongolian people in China. It is derived from Mongol ancestors'custom of riding, shooting and wrestling formed in the nomadic life. The word "Nadam" in Mongolian is a joint term of Mongolian-type wrestling, riding and shooting. The Nadam Fair falls on the fourth day of the sixth lunar month (between July and August in solar calendar), and people of any ethnic group and religious belief are allowed to participate in.

Origin

The forerunner of the Nadam Fair is the Mongolian stone heaps which can be traced back to the initial stage of the Mongol Empire. In order to pray for and celebrate a good harvest as well as inspect the army, Genghis Khan convened annual gathering of clan leaders and organized contests of shooting, horse racing or wrestling. By the late Qing Dynasty, the Nadam Fair had evolved into a recreational activity which was regularly held by the government. The Mongol NationalityAobao (Mongolian Stone Heaps for Worship)

Three Feats of the Nadam Fair

Archery, horse racing and wrestling are the fixed sports items in the Nadam Fair. Later the three sports items are shortened as "Nadam" by the Mongolians.

Horse Racing

Horse-Racing of Mongolian Minority
The Mongolian grassland abounds in the well-known Mongolian horse, which is reputed for its racing and fighting skills as well as its great stamina. Since time immemorial, the Mongolians have developed a special feeling toward the horse.

Mongolian Wrestling

Bokh (Mongolian Wrestling)
The Mongolian grassland abounds in the well-known Mongolian horse, which is reputed for its racing and fighting skills as well as its great stamina. Since time immemorial, the Mongolians have developed a special feeling toward the horse.

Archery

Archery
The Mongolian grassland abounds in the well-known Mongolian horse, which is reputed for its racing and fighting skills as well as its great stamina. Since time immemorial, the Mongolians have developed a special feeling toward the horse.

The Briskly Trotting Horse

Long melody ballad of the Xilinkuole Prairie.

It is a large-scale long melody banquet ballad spreading in the Xilinkuole Prairie of Inner Mongolia. The song, including all the skills required in singing long melody ballad, is very difficult to sing. It is vigorous and firm, bold and unconstrained with flamboyant adornment, one of the representative works of the Mongolian long melody in its heyday.

Experience the Charm of the Grassland Minority

Every year on the Nadam Fair, the herdsmen will put on festive costumes and ride a horse to the spot of the Fair where numerous tents will be set up. In the daytime, other than the three traditional items, sports events such as polo, horsemanship, track and field etc will be held; during the night, a great variety of art performances will be put on, adding to the vast grassland an exciting and bustling atmosphere.

Appreciation of the classical grassland ballads

When night falls, the melodious tune of the horse-head fiddle will be wafting on the grassland. Men and women, singing and dancing around the bonfire, are immersing themselves in the happy atmosphere of the festival.

The Aged Wild Goose

Long melody ballad of Hulun Buir
It is a long melody ballad of Hulun Buir. In 1955, Boindeleger sang the song Romance of the Grassland with her oriole-like voice, winning the gold prize in the Fifth World Youth Festival.

Romance of the Grassland

Long melody ballad of XilinKuole
It is an ancient philosophical ballad expressing the pathos of the elder. Through the relationship of the seven nestling birds and the aged one, the song reveals the deep love of the old towards the young, implying in a deeper sense the natural rule of birth, aging, illness and death as well as the selfless and expansive spiritual world of the old.